Wednesday, March 16, 2011

I'm a Certified Alpaca Color Checker

Last Saturday I had the pleasure of taking my very first Color Compliance Class.

Every year the Alpaca Breeders of the Rockies (ABR) hosts this class.  It  is taught by a Certified AOBA Judge with classroom, test and practical portions.

We reviewed the many colors, solids, patterns vs pintos, fancy vs. appaloosa and greys.  We also reviewed all of the data to be verified at Color Check during a show and the process for escalating disagreements between the Color Checker and Owner.

All color checkers for the local shows are required to have passed this class each year.

The Great Western Alpaca Show (GWAS) will be held in Denver on April 29 through May 1st and has been the largest alpaca show in the US for the last couple of years.  This will be my first time attending and my second time helping out with a fiber show.

The Alpaca Owners and Breeders Association's (AOBA) National Show is also in Denver this year on May 19 - 22nd.  This will be my first opportunity to attend Nationals.  I've heard this is a great event.

ABR also hosts the Fall Festival and Harvest Fleece Show every year in Loveland, Colorado.  This year it will be held on November 5th and 6th.

4 comments:

Spinster Beth said...

Congratulations!

Jaimie said...

Congratulations! I love learning new skills.

I have a friend who lives in an intentional community in Loveland.

Oak Haven Alpacas said...

what a great idea to have such a class! I have never heard of one. I did color check with absolutely no training. I'd been an alpaca farmer for a couple years, but still, those unusual colors can cause questions.

I hope you enjoy Nationals. We went last year, and well, I've learned more at many smaller shows. It wasn't quite what I was hoping it would be. But it was definitely good to go.

Cara

Kathryn Ray said...

@Cara - I can't imagine doing color check without some training. With so many animals coming thru. It's important to get it right and sometimes those colors look really similar. Then there's the fawn-greys and indeterminates that get really confusing.